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+ Today was my grandmother’s (z’l) second Yartzheit. 
This photo was taken 2.5 years ago on her 89th birthday about 6 months before she passed away. We baked a cake and actually lit 89 candles! 
My grandmother, Leah bat Shmuel is one of the people I respect most in this world.
She was the eldest in her family and survived the Holocaust because she was brought out of Germany by an English family on the condition that she would study to be a nurse. My grandmother would tell me stories about how she arrived in England with only the clothes on her back, after her trunk was stolen on the train. She would tell me about the hospital dances she was forced to attend and the doctors she had to dance with - even though she didn’t want to. During the Blitz she always help the patients to safety, before protecting herself. 
One of my favourite photos of my grandmother (which I’m sure I will post one day) is her wedding photo that was taken in 1946. It always amazes me how she looked so completely happy, even though she had literally just lost everything - her parents, her home and her previous life. 
My grandmother and I had a lot in common. We both like to read, eat blueberries, take care of our health. We’re both romantics. She would support me in everything I did - from videos I made, to stories I wroteת my piano playing and radio show. 
Everyday when I would come home from school, my grandmother would be sitting in her armchair reading a romance. She would always ask me how my day was, how I did on tests and assignments and we would ‘hang out’ for a bit. 
I feel honoured and privileged that my grandmother lived with me (and slept in the room next to mine) for four years. It was a beautiful opportunity that allowed me to get to really know her - before that, I would only see my grandmother once a year. I’ll be eternally grateful to my grandmother for agreeing to move here, my mother for moving her here and Hashem - for allowing me to spend so much time with her and granting her permanent residence here. 
Even though its already been two years, I still think about my grandmother everyday. Even now, as I’m typing this, I’m sitting in ‘Bubba’s chair”. Bubba, I think about you when I sit in your chair, when I sleep with the blankets that you crocheted me, when I walk past the street corner that you always rest at, and blankets that cover the couches throughout the house. I think about you when I walk past my brothers room and when I see the photos of you, and my other grandparents all around the house. 
But most of all Bubba, today I want your Neshama to have an aliyah. I want Mashiach to finally come and to see you again. I want you at my graduations, my weddings, my children’s births. I want to see you at all the events that I assumed you’d live to see. 
זכר צדקת לברכה 

Today was my grandmother’s (z’l) second Yartzheit. 

This photo was taken 2.5 years ago on her 89th birthday about 6 months before she passed away. We baked a cake and actually lit 89 candles! 

My grandmother, Leah bat Shmuel is one of the people I respect most in this world.

She was the eldest in her family and survived the Holocaust because she was brought out of Germany by an English family on the condition that she would study to be a nurse. My grandmother would tell me stories about how she arrived in England with only the clothes on her back, after her trunk was stolen on the train. She would tell me about the hospital dances she was forced to attend and the doctors she had to dance with - even though she didn’t want to. During the Blitz she always help the patients to safety, before protecting herself. 

One of my favourite photos of my grandmother (which I’m sure I will post one day) is her wedding photo that was taken in 1946. It always amazes me how she looked so completely happy, even though she had literally just lost everything - her parents, her home and her previous life. 

My grandmother and I had a lot in common. We both like to read, eat blueberries, take care of our health. We’re both romantics. She would support me in everything I did - from videos I made, to stories I wroteת my piano playing and radio show. 

Everyday when I would come home from school, my grandmother would be sitting in her armchair reading a romance. She would always ask me how my day was, how I did on tests and assignments and we would ‘hang out’ for a bit. 

I feel honoured and privileged that my grandmother lived with me (and slept in the room next to mine) for four years. It was a beautiful opportunity that allowed me to get to really know her - before that, I would only see my grandmother once a year. I’ll be eternally grateful to my grandmother for agreeing to move here, my mother for moving her here and Hashem - for allowing me to spend so much time with her and granting her permanent residence here. 

Even though its already been two years, I still think about my grandmother everyday. Even now, as I’m typing this, I’m sitting in ‘Bubba’s chair”. Bubba, I think about you when I sit in your chair, when I sleep with the blankets that you crocheted me, when I walk past the street corner that you always rest at, and blankets that cover the couches throughout the house. I think about you when I walk past my brothers room and when I see the photos of you, and my other grandparents all around the house. 

But most of all Bubba, today I want your Neshama to have an aliyah. I want Mashiach to finally come and to see you again. I want you at my graduations, my weddings, my children’s births. I want to see you at all the events that I assumed you’d live to see. 

זכר צדקת לברכה 

  1. zavatchalavudvash posted this